Drop City Redux, Post 3: The collaborators

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Day Three I finished setting up  Archival  Structure 7.  This was first constructed as a sphere, but turned out to be more structurally sound and easier to interact with as two hemispheres. It first appeared publicly as part of the two-person show (with Jim ShrosbreeImmaterial Material at Drake University in Des Moines Iowa. This version of the piece involved a collaboration with art students at that college: see this post for the details.

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For this second version, I once again showed the Drake collaborations. For potential Oshkosh  collaborators, I also created new, round boxes. On the top of this hemisphere: my collaboration with Drake student Nora Kreml.

Nora is both an art and art history major, the two fields intersect provocatively in her work concerning maps and cartography. See her map-based visual art here, See her art history thesis here.

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Claire Sedovic. A sample of here graphic design here.

Nicole Dyers contribution to 'Archival Structure 7', a hemispherical, collaborative, interactive recycled art sculpture. The hemisphere is covered with boxes that can be opened and even removed, inside are collages by the artist and his collaborator. Nicole is an art student at Drake U in Iowa.

Nicole Ashley Dyar.

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I encouraged the students at Drake to make a collages that reflected both their daily consumption and daily personal experience.Dyar’s collage is made from detritus culled from a recent study-abroad experience in Italy.  Dyar is also a journalism student, and wrote an article about my work for the Des Moines art magazine Urban Plains.

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Kiersten Lutz.

When I work with students, I don’t tell them what my part will look like: I only provide basic formal and conceptual parameters for the collaboration. For this reason, it is always fascinating when there is a visual connection between the works. Kiersten was experimenting with nested boxes before this project, so the ‘rainbow connection’ is purely coincidental.

Find an image of one of Lutz’s prints here, and a painting here.

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Tatiana Klusak serves up a densely packed collection of media. I still haven’t gone through all of this yet.

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Daniel Reishus.  An intricate 3D collage that reminds me of these works by Sarah Sze. A drawing by Daniel here, a collage here.

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All of the boxes can be removed from the sphere and taken aside for closer examination. I  provide a pedestal or table for this purpose, and set a couple boxes on them to make the intended interaction clear. Here is Erica Rockey’s contribution. Rocky is both an artist and graphic designer. See her design work here.

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Adam Oestreich.

Adam is an artist, scholar and athlete. The Drake students amaze me with the diversity of their interests. I know I was involved in a lot of activities as an undergrad, but what these students do now—with internet stuff on top of it—blows my mind.

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There didn’t end up being enough time to do the interactive boxes with the Oshkosh students: the domes were our sole collaboration.  The boxes turned out well, however, and the opportunity to contribute to them will pass to the next set of student collaborators.

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The new boxes, like the old, feature an integrated handle. I reversed the shape arrangement–to a circular box with a rectilinear collage–but retained the rainbow pattern.

Next time: problems with the wall work and a few shots of the finished installation. See you soon.

 

 

 

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